Popcorn Ceilings & How We Fake Planked Them

planked popcorn ceilingslight fixture found here and I promise I have a great lightbulb in it now!

An in-process shot. Because in real life projects aren’t don in a day. Sometimes not even a month.

We started on a three-part project three weeks ago, for different reasons we couldn’t have it worked on every day, we took a little break before we started the master bedroom ceilings, just to catch our breath and have normal for a few days and it’s still not done because the worst part is, now I’m responsible for painting all of it.

So in this, the longest post ever, I’ll do my best to explain the how and why we removed the popcorn ceiling of our home (built in 1987) adding fake planks to the ceiling and adding simple, fresh trim everywhere.

We focused on the first floor of our house–not including our mudroom/backporch/laundry area or the master bath or closet (these two rooms need gut jobs one day so we’ll be patient). The area we’ve been working on (family room, dining area, kitchen, hall, stairwell and master bedroom) is right at about 1000 square feet.

Here’s our story…

fake plank your ceiling

Home projects can literally take over your home for a long time. It’s the ugly part that no one talks about on HGTV.

But I’d still choose it again 1000 times because the result is going to be so worth it. I’ve been saving up for this project and wanting it done since we first entered this house–it’s money well spent. I’ll tell you how much we spent at the end of this post, once I share all that we did/are doing.

popcorn ceiling

So, we had a house full of popcorn ceilings…

ceiling

…except for in the kitchen that we remodeled two years ago. We tore out the original ceilings in there since we were moving walls and forever it’s been drywall with a thin coat of primer on that ceiling.

I am what my friend Kendra calls a Lazy Genius. I consider that a high compliment.

So one of the ways I try to be smart is to know when I need help. The ceiling was one of these times. I’m not technical, detail oriented or a perfectionist. These traits are simultaneously good and bad. So we hired help.

back porch

First, a little backstory:

We bought this house two years ago. Long enough for it to talk to me and long enough for me to listen.

My favorite room in the house as far as looks, is the little back porch/mudroom/weird room. Why? All the crazy paneling–which is mostly the same 12 inch pine that’s on our floors inside the house–we had to remove some of it from the walls in the porch to replace the wood floor in the kitchen, but once we added in more wood and painted it all white, it had such a nice feel and felt like it was the most true room of the entire house. Insert lots of emojis with heart eyes.

bathroom

So when it came time to do the boy’s bathroom, I knew I wanted that same feeling. We hired out for both the bathroom and ceiling projects (Emily explains perfectly why here). And I love how the bathroom turned out.

Sean, our brilliant contractor-type friend (the same genius who helped us remake over our barn) had the idea to simply use luan to fake the plank look. Luan is a thin, pinkish, wood-like product and is lightweight. It’s also SO much less expensive than real tongue and grove planks–which in a perfect world, I’d prefer.

I did some research and saw other people have used luan (and even read their disclaimers about how it can look warped) and we dove in. First we practiced on the upstairs bathroom.

cut luan

In the bathroom we (every time I say ‘we’ I mean Sean) had the luan cut into 8 inch strips (it comes in 4 x 8′ sheets) Sean used those strips on the ceiling and the walls of the bathroom.

bathroom planked walls and ceiling

For the downstairs ceiling, I wanted it to look like our ceiling was planked with the same wood as our floors–so we went with 12 inch strips. Sean used loctite construction adhesive and lots of nails to keep the boards up.

Sean also has connections and was able to have our local store pre-cut all the millions of sheets of luan to our desired width for free or a super minimal cost. That’s a TON of cuts when you think about planking a ceiling of our entire downstairs.

This process has worked great for us so far. But beware, it’s not for the faint of heart or perfectionists. First, gluing something to your ceiling is pretty permanent, it can be removed but there will be damage to the ceiling. Second, you are at the mercy of both how perfectly level your ceilings are, and how perfectly straight the people who make 1 million of your 12 inch wide cuts are willing to cut your boards.

Things will be out of your control and you will have to handle it.

planked ceiling

There are places where our ceiling looks wavy, but if you put a level against it, it’s perfectly level. Here’s the thing, if your boards are cut just slightly off perfection, it gives the illusion that your ceiling is slightly wavy. After the first day I didn’t really notice but if you are super picky, you’ll either want to use actual tongue and grove planks, or cut all of your boards yourself to perfection. (costs time or money you pick)

fake planks and gaps on the ceiling

Also, because of the imperfection of our walls and boards we ended up with some gaps. Which of course is my favorite part! Hashtag Imperfectionist Diva.

I love the look mostly because it mimics our wood floors and adds to the rustic farmhouse feel. It literally looks like our backporch/laundry room ceiling–where our floors line most of the walls and ceiling but are painted white–my dream come true.

Just a note about style–as a Cozy Minimalist who values opposites, adding all this rustic charm allows me to move in a little more modern arena  for a few pieces in my house because it will be balanced out. Fun!

nester's wood flooors 12 inch pine planksour 12″ pine floors–milled here at the old sawmill on our property 28 years ago

We have all sorts of big gaps that don’t match up and cracks in our floors which are a pain when I sweep, but they give our floor that 100-year-old house look. The floors were the SINGLE redeeming quality in this house when we bought it. Easily my favorite part.

And now, our ceilings look exactly the same as the floors–just painted. I absolutely love it. But I’m high on perfection and quirks and low on uniformity. If you need to not see weird gaps this project might not be for you.

I have noticed in the boys bathroom with the smaller 8 inch width boards the weird gap issue is hardly noticeable, so it might have to do with the fact that our boards are a full 12 inches wide, but that plays so nicely with our 12 inch floors that it was 100% worth it to me.

planking the ceiling

how to plank ceilings

Above: one night we got crazy and primed all the luan that was on the ceiling thus far–the next day, Sean came and finished the kitchen, which is why half of it has a coat of primer and half still sits untouched. Even today two weeks later.

removing popcorn from the ceiling

Removing the popcorn ceiling: I am writing this post out-of-order, so sorry!

First of all let it be said that I BEGGED Sean to do this project without removing that popcorn. I had all sorts of arguments why the planks could be just glued and nailed right over the existing ceiling.

But Sean wouldn’t go for it. He wasn’t comfortable gluing something onto the popcorn, even if he was using nails too. Plus, I think he wanted to double-check what kind of shape our ceilings were truly in. And, because the boards are SO thin, he was worried it could be uneven. I still think it could probably be done successfully if you test an area first, but it’s nice to do things the better way too.

Sean put plastic EVERYWHERE, even down the walls (1 or 2 mil thick for the floors/ .3 mil (thinner) for the walls & to cover the furniture), and sprayed a section of ceiling with warm water, waited a few minutes, and with a long scraper, scraped off the popcorn. It came off all globby and since it was wet, it was messy on the plastic on the floor, but didn’t create all the dust I expected. Invest in plastic and you’ll not have to clean up as much.

We had furniture on the porch and the rest we moved into whatever room he wasn’t currently working on and covered it in plastic.

planking

This is SUCH an intrusive project. But worth it to me. Since we are also redoing all of our trim around the floorboard, windows and doors and painting everything, we know our home will be in chaos for a while.

trim

“simply white” paint on the left above the window//designer white on the right

My boys took turns every day helping Sean put the planks up.

And they helped prime and paint (Ace Hardware’s Clark & Kensington’s Designer White paint plus primer if you are wondering–I’m using it EVERYWHERE because I’m obsessed with the brightest white I can have, I’m using it for the trim, walls & ceiling–ceiling paint & eggshell finish).

But then school started and now our painting has slowed waaay down.

popcorn off ceilings

I just realized there’s a random toe in this photo. My apologies. That’s so gross.

priming

what can you do?What can you do?

This is our life for the next little while. So I’m focusing on creating one sane space at a time. And I already love the changes so much, it’s worth all the trouble.

in process

new trim

new trim

DSC_3395

DSC_3326

As far as cost–because I ALWAYS wonder about these things…

Sean has been here on and off for 3 weeks:

He removed about 1000 square feet of popcorn ceiling (plus our stairwell) and cleaned it all up (glory!) fake planked all of that same ceiling, removed all of our old baseboards and installed 6 inch baseboards around the entire downstairs, removed all the window and door casings on the first floor and installed 4 inch boards around everything, installed “crown molding” just a simple 3 inch board around the top of all the walls (including the stairwell and framing it out) plus he framed the end of our kitchen cabinets (he’s doing that today!) and he also repaired two overhead lighting electrical issues, plus an outlet or two.

The cost for his labor and material (I think he’s finishing today so I’m just guestimating this weeks work) looks like it’s going to be about $3,500 give or take. We do have some supplies he’ll return, and we also paid our boys some to work with him on days when he had to lift up those 8 foot long boards to the ceiling.

Plus, we save money by painting everything our selves. Which I have to remind myself we can take our time. EVERYTHING needs to be painted, walls, ceilings, trims. So add the cost of paint in there too.

kitchen

new trim

This is a project that you could do completely on your own. But we’ve learned over the past two years, that Chad & I and our marriage are all happier when he gets to go out and do the kind of work he’d prefer and is better at, when I get to do the kind of work I prefer and am better at, and we hire someone to do the work we’d prefer not to do and they are better at.

This was a huge investment for us, one we’ve hoped to do since we purchased this house two years ago, and even without being painted it changed the entire personality of our home–she just grew into what she always hoped to be. Everything feels cleaner and fresh and like a wonderful blank slate.

I’ve waited 20 years and 14 houses for this. It was worth it, I promise.

Finished, glamour shots forthcoming.

 

Related

DIY black framed windows

How we paid off $150,000 of debt in 5 years

When you’re a cozy minimalist

Because sharing the imperfect is worth the risk

 how & why we fake planked our ceilings

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Comments

  1. Can’t wait to see the glamour shots! I love the look of planks. Our ceilings aren’t planked, but when we “cleaned” up our little house we used luan on the ceilings and painted them white (except that one room we painted the ceiling blue). I also used it on the walls in one bedroom and stripped it to mimic board and batten – everything in that room, even the floors is painted Honey White by Sherwin Williams. I also like the simple woodwork trim – ours is like that too and I love it. I don’t envy you the mess, but it is such fun to have a redo! I’m thinking you may be more patient than me – I’d be going a little crazy about now. It will be so worth it! I’m glad you show us the backside of your projects as well as the finished results.

    • well, I am NOT patient. but years of living in homes that I couldn’t make any changes have helped me remember how worth it is, but the moment sean leaves today I’m getting out my paint brush!

      PS, your blog is beautiful.

      • Thank you! I’ve been in the process of tweaking it lately and trying to get back into the swing of writing again. I have loved your blog since sometime in 2008 when I stumbled upon it via Proverbs 31. You have been on my list of must read blogs ever since!

  2. myquillyn …. I LOOOOVVE it! what an incredible difference! can’t wait to see the end result!!!!

  3. I 100% feel you on this. We hired out our ceiling work during the post-flood renovations. The guys (hubby and friends) scraped the nasty popcorn off throughout the entire (2,300 sq ft) house. It was a terrible job that seemed unending. We moved walls so ceilings had to be patched and then it wasn’t level in some places because it’s an 80s house and not new. We hired out the texture job and it seriously took like a month. I actually started my blog because of those renovations and I’m so glad I did! It’s neat to look back on and see how far we’ve come. We still have miles of trim to caulk and paint and all the doors plus some walls need painting too. Its daunting for sure!

  4. Whooosh, what a story. I’m exhausted! What a job! Yeah, I was going to ask about if it could’ve been done with the popcorn. Makes sense this was better. Of course on the other side of the bulk done, you can have no regrets. Love the layout openness roaming space.
    Question: when one has crap windows – do you frame anyways? Or does that accent the crapo’ness, do you think?

    • I honestly think it would be fine with the popcorn untouched, but don’t tell sean I said that! And I’m NOT a professional! clearly, I paid someone to remove ours, so don’t listen to me!

      If I had windows I wanted to replace in a house I owned, I’d probably just go for drapes everywhere and use them as an ‘arrow’ to dectract from the windows. Unless I knew I’d never replace them, then I’d consider reframing!

  5. THEY LOOK AMAZING!! I can’t wait to see them.

    I know there is probably a reason Sean did it in this order, but could you not have painted the planks first before you put them up? Only thinking out loud if I ever do this and I need to start lifting weights now because my arms are in no shape to paint my whole ceiling. ;) xoxo

    • Yes, in theory a person could totally do that and make it work! But, realistically for us, dirty hands are touching the planks measuring the width and nailing a thousand holes with the nailer, plus, with every cut that you make at home it would leave marks. I guess if your husband or you were doing it, and you had the time to cut them (length-wise) and let them dry before the install it could be great, but you’d probably still have to do one final coat once they are up.

  6. I love it, but I’m curious as to why you chose the 3 inch board instead of more traditional crown molding?

  7. When you pointed out the random toe, it started me chuckling! Now I just feel like laughing, and it’s all because of the Lone Phalange! The house looks great. If only I could wiggle my nose and make our popcorn ceilings disappear.

  8. Wahoo!!! Congratulations on such great progress with such a profound influence on the space!

    I love fake planking! I just built a brand new home, and though I do have some “real” planks in pine, I also have some fake planks in MDF, but the ultimate FAKE….came a year after living here and realizing that I totally should have planked the wall behind my clawfoot tub. I had recently read in Country Living? Magazine of a designer who fake planked her stairwell walls by DRAWING PLANKS ON HER WALL WITH PENCIL! I figured there was nothing to lose and it was free and a great “temporary” solution, so I went for it. And guess what?!?!?! It’s super awesome! And unless you put your face inches away from it, you’d never know the difference! I used a carpenters pencil and long 6 inch thick quilting ruler and drew deep lines into my walls. Sometimes the lines are thicker in some places than others and it only adds to the look. I’ve shown it to other people and they didn’t even know it wasn’t real until I told them and they looked super super close. Just thought I’d throw that solution out there for anyone interested :) Even as an interim one.

    • Yee haw! that is the ultimate fake! and really smart! I think Mandi from Vintage Revivals has a post about that too!

      SOOOO SMART!

    • Love the idea of just drawing the lines on.

    • THAT IS A FABULOUS IDEA! NOT REALLY FAKE THOUGH, AS AN OTIS ART COLLEGE GRAD, INTERIOR DESIGN, I WOULD CALL THIS A TERM USED FOR CENTURIES, OF COURSE I CAN’T REMEMBER, MANY SUCH TERMS, FOR THIS ANCEINT ART OF PAINTING, DRAWING, ARCHTECTURAL INTEREST,PAINTING COLUMS, CEILINGS, ALL, TO APPEAR REAL AS THEY DO! CURIOUS IF YOU DREW YOUR LINES TO APPEAR 3 DIMENSIONAL, AS THEY MUST APPEAR, EVEN IF ACCIDENTALLY SO? DID YOU TRY TO ADD NAIL HEADS ANYWHERE, DO YOU THINK THAT WOULD PASS THE CLOSE UP TEST? KUDOS TO YOU!

      • ALSO FORGOT TO GIVE GREAT KUDOS TO YOU NESTER, FOR EVERYTHING YOU DO. YOU HAVE CREATED THE MOST SERENE, ANTIQUE, FARMHOUSE LOOK COMBINED WITH YOUR GLAMOUR, FOR A HUGE COST SAVINGS. ALTHOUGH IT GIVES ME SORE ARMS, NECK, BACK, TO JUST LOOK AT YOUR JOB. AS A FORMER DESIGNER, HOUSE FLIPPER, WHO ALWAYS LOVED DOING THE “MAN’S JOB”, SANDING 2 k FT. OF WOOD FLOORS, ALL THE PAINTING, BUILDING MY WINDOW SEATS, KITCHEN BENCH, STORAGE NOOKS. MY MESSAGE NOW IT TO DO THESE GREAT JOBS BEFORE YOUR TOO OLD, (GOT VERY INJURED IN CAR WRECK BY A DRUNK DRIVER), AND BROKE. I ANNOYED MY SECOND HUSBAND, AND VERY GOOD CARPENTER, LANDSCAPER, HANDYMAN, MUCH WITH MY OBSESSIVE, NEVER PROCRASTINATE, GET THE JOB DONE NOW, ATTITUDE. ENLISTING HIS HELP OF COURSE, THAT WHEN WE DIVORCED HE TOLD THE COUNSELOR WE SAW, THAT THIS WAS WHAT HE DISLIKED OF ME!! NOT TOO INSULTING, HIS ONLY COMPLAINT. AND HE WAS MORE THAN HAPPY TO TAKE HIS HALF OF THE MILLION IN EQIUTY WE CREATED IN OUR LAST HOME, WE BOTH ENJOYED THE END RESULT TREMENDOUSLY, HE WANTED TO STAY MARRIED! I DIDN’T CARE TO BE MARRIED TO ONE WHO NEEDED TO MAKE HIS WIFE OUT TO BE THE PROVERBIAL “NAG”. LESSON HERE, GET AS MUCH LABOR OUT OF YOUR HUSBAND AS POSSIBLE
        HA! GLAD TO SEE WHAT A TIGHT, LOVING, SECURE FAMILY YOU’VE CREATED!

  9. LOVE it! I’m totally curious though, did you purposefully choose to run the ceiling boards perpendicular to the flooring instead of the same direction?

  10. LOVE the ceilings! I kept wondering what you used, because I’m dying to plank my ceilings, but not eager for the cost. I even thought about the 4×8 sheets of panelling, even though I’m afraid it will look too cheap. I’m loving your trim too. Were pine boards cheaper than the primed MDF boards? I was planning on using those, but heard that they have to be cut outside because something in them causes cancer or something. I’m all about making sacrifices to make my house more beautiful, but I have to draw the line at that. ;p looks awesome though—as always.

    • “causes cancer or something”
      isn’t that the story of our lives now? to answer your question–I have no idea. We now let Sean decide stuff like that, he’s super budget aware, but also has deep thoughts on what materials and why. So I just trust him to make decisions like that!

  11. Looking forward to seeing the finished glamour shots! Also, what font/graphic app do you use for putting the graphics over your photos?

    • I’m dorky and use the keynote program that came with my mac–then I screen shot–it works and I don’t have to learn it, but there are a million better ways than that.

  12. this is perfection.

  13. I love it so so much! As someone who has read your blog for a LONG time I’m just so excited and happy for you!! I totally get the needing to hire it out for the sake of your marriage and sanity thing, haha! Looks fantastic, I’m excited to see it all painted white. xoxo

  14. Let me tell you what a great deal you got or an awful deal I got. I had my bedroom ceiling planked with tongue and groove and painted and it cost 1000.00 plus materials. I want to do more rooms but need to find someone cheaper apparently!

  15. Angela Arnold says:

    I’m in LOVE!!!

  16. Our newly-moved-into -house is FULL of popcorn ceilings. My husband doesn’t mind them.

    I say ‘yuck.’

    I love this planked look, and I especially think it would be cool on our cathedral ceilings in this little cape house.

    Maybe if I ask real nice … he’ll say YES!

    ;-}

  17. Your ceiling looks lovely. We have popcorn ceilings in our whole house. It really doesn’t bother me.

  18. Reading this post gives me courage to make a change in my home even if it won’t turn out perfectly. You inspire me with your ability to be okay with the less-than-perfect in such a project. Looking at the BIG picture is one of the many things I’m learning from you. Love your ceilings!

  19. Teddee Grace says:

    Your fake tongue-and-groove (two oo’s) looks great.

  20. Looking good. I second your philosophy on hiring out work. We’ve started to save up and hire out what we can do. It blesses 2 families that way :) Sounds like you got a great deal to boot.

    • I want to thank you for say it blesses two families. I’m retired and just not fit enough to do much and wear more paint than the walls when I paint. I just hired some men to redo my kitchen cupboards and the floor and was feeling like I was letting all the DIYers down, and not expecting enough from myself. Now I feel much better, I’m helping a couple other families! Yes!

  21. We used the same material for our board and batten walls and kitchen ceiling. Instead of planks on our ceiling we did 4×4 squares trimmed out in a grid. Getting such large pieces on the ceiling was tricky! Lol
    I can commiserate with the endless remodels…we’ve been in our house two years as well and are currently working on the master suite–on a baby deadline, ha! We’ve got about 6 weeks to go. Chaos? Yup. Worth it? Yup.

  22. Yay! The progress must feel wonderful. When we bought our 80’s house 18 months ago, I REFUSED to move in until we dealt with the popcorn ceilings. The taking down part wasn’t that big of a deal, but the endless sanding so we could paint them was a mess!!! Our house was also full of dark gold and red paint and 26 years of tobacco smoke. We got 2 coats of primer, a coat of paint, and freshly painted ceilings throughout the house before we moved in. Endless hours of work over a 3 week period. We are just starting to get the energy to tackle some other projects–I want to paint my kitchen cabinets, and all the dark trim & doors throughout the house. By the way, I have been working for a custom-home builder for the past year and he uses the plain trim throughout his craftsman-styled homes. I like it!

  23. I laughed and laughed about the “toe” because I honestly didn’t see it until I read your comment; I think I was too mesmerized by the unusual coloring of that gorgeous cat. I’m saying to myself, “what toe? I don’t see a toe.” How funny. Love the look you’re going to eventually have; I think it will perfectly suit your farmhouse. It wouldn’t work in my house at all, but I think it’s perfect for you….and I love reading about all your projects…although it always makes me tired. You must take a ton of vitamins—I simply don’t have the amount of energy you seem to have. But then again, I’m 64. So just a word to all you younger ladies….do what you can now because when you hit your late 50’s and early 60’s, that energy level takes a nosedive. Can’t wait to see the finished shots.

    • The truth is I am kind of exhausted. This is our last big home project this year–we really only did two-the bathroom and this, but the planning for it, living in it, and such does take a toll. But, also I secretly really, REALLY enjoy it because it’s SO fun to see the changes.

  24. I am amazed by the difference in the white paint and the “simply white”! This is probably why my “white” guest room doesn’t feel white enough. Glad I saw that before I started painting the kitchen!

  25. wow! WOW! What a huge job! I am so excited for you and can not wait to see the “glamor” shots but so glad you shared the “whole” story. I feel so much better having permission to not DIY when I really do not know what I am doing. Thank you! You are the best!

  26. I call them Cottage Cheese Ceilings, and they are the bane of my domestic existence. They aren’t even crisp white, but some undefinable grey. The toe is awesome.

  27. This was so fun to see in pictures! The nit, the grit, and a few pretty pics too! What a transformative project. Love it in the weirdroom, bathroom, family room and kitchen…errywhere!

  28. So appreciate your philosophy of not waiting for perfect. It’s filled with such grace and something that I hope to embrace now that I’ve crossed over to my 50’s. Would love to see a simple plan of this space. You’re listing the same rooms I have in 1000 sq ft, but yours seems no much bigger and more open. Wondering where I might drop a wall. :-)

  29. I would have been so with you on begging him to put the planking over the popcorn! It’s been my experience that men come up with all kinds of reasons to do things the hardest way possible! ;) Can’t wait to see the whole thing finished! I already love it though!

  30. Congratulations on another long awaited change being almost done! Having lived in homes that were built in the 1905-1920 era until recently, level ceilings, walls, and floors are not something I am well acquainted with. Even in our current home, which for better or worse we built ourselves, level surfaces are rather unusual. A straight line? What’s that? On some walls I have to decide whether I will hang the artwork according to the actual wall or the trim. Either way it will look crooked. One of my solutions is to hang it crooked on purpose. It’s all good. We did it ourselves. Wish distance from town and low budget hadn’t gotten in the way of having it hired it out, but it’s mostly done, and when it’s all full of love and family it’s beautiful no matter what’s on the walls or ceiling. Seriously, who will even notice gaps in the floor or ceiling when you, your family, and that beautiful feline are there spilling out the beauty bubbling up and out of yourselves?

  31. Oh gosh, I really needed to read this post today. Totally have the kitchen ripped apart and painting the walls while staring at that dreaded popcorn ceiling. Is designer white a pure out of the can white, or slightly tinted? So far, I’m using white white (tinted with more white so it’s brighter) and loving it!

  32. Forgot to say, I am infatuated with your changes! ❤️❤️❤️

  33. We found 4 x 8 sheets of paneling that looks just like planks. We put it up and then put boards on the seams that looks like beams. Very fast and inexpensive.

  34. Ya’ll are doing a great job and I love the look. We have been in my hubby’s childhood home for about 36 years now (I can remember because I was preggers with son #2 at the time)and have been working on it all this time…there’s nothing level or square in this old house. It was built with old wood from another house and the ceilings aren’t quite 8 foot. that’s the bad part. The good part is the heart pine walls in the living room. They were in the dining room too, until one Christmas and a candle that got out of control….long story. Short story is that we couldn’t replicate that heart pine to match what was used and so I went with….white painted wood planks! This really perked things up. I could write a book about everything we have done to this old house. What we’ve ended up with is my version of Country Farmhouse French/early Redneck. Lots of wood, white, bead board, etc. We went with bead board to cover the yucky popcorn ceilings in the kitchen (which a contractor talked us into), which worked fine for part of it. The other part that was an enclosed back porch has a slant to it to an extent there’s nowhere to nail the bead board to. I’m still puzzling what to do about that. Ack! Maybe we’ll finish our ‘remodeling’ before we get too old and creaky to enjoy it….or maybe it’s what keeps us going!

  35. We’re about to pull the trigger…no really, we have the boards in the garage and we’ve scrapped off the popcorn. However, I’ve borrowed a friends set of nailguns, any idea what Sean used in regards to type of nailgun and size of nails?

  36. Michelle Fitzgerald says:

    We just did the fake plank in my laundry room as a dry run to my kitchen. In my mind I wanted all the same length boards and just butt them up together, but the luan doesn’t come any longer than 8ft at my local store. I wanted to ask if this is the same length you used and if you are good with the staggered lines on the ceiling? I didn’t want mine to look like flooring but yours looks great. Are you happy with the staggered lines?

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